Browsing All Posts filed under »Part 4«

Reflective account – Part four – The Classical Style

November 13, 2013

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Open College of the Arts, Music 1, Tibor Kovacs, October 2013   The musical formats defined and refined in the Classical period have been serving as gold standard models for the following centuries. The musicians of the eighteenth century seem to have developed very successful recipes for creating art that would please both the senses […]

Classical influences in the music of the twentieth century: two early examples by Prokofiev and Stravinsky

November 13, 2013

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Open College of the Arts assignment, Music 1, Part Four Tibor Kovacs, October 2013   It is certainly not an overstatement to say that the classical period (from the early eighteenth to the early nineteenth century) produced the most successful musical style in the Western tradition, with a wide popular appeal lasting for centuries, combined […]

Igor Stravinsky – Pulcinella (ballet)

October 9, 2013

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Igor Stravinsky “fell victim” to the charm of classical music, when he stumbled into a project initiated by the choreographer Léonide Massine and Sergei Diaghilev. Their intention was to bring to life the Neapolitan commedia del arte play Pulcinella in the form of a Ballets Russes production. To understand the nature of this piece, I […]

Sergei Prokofiev – Symphony No. 1 in D major, Op. 25 “Classical Symphony”

October 9, 2013

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Composing his first symphony, Prokofiev’s declared intention was to create an original piece of music in classical style, drawing inspiration from the works of Joseph Haydn and other classical composers, such as the Mannheim group. But how could a composer who made a name for himself with modernistic pieces as his Piano Concerto No.1 or […]

Historically informed performance – evolution or devolution?

October 6, 2013

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I have recently been to a piano recital at St Christopher’s Hospice in South London, where a Beethoven Sonata, Chopin Fantasies and Impromptus, and adaptations of Schubert’s songs by Liszt, Thalberg and Heller. The pianist being Elena Margolina, one of the leading interpreters of Schubert’s music, she played all these pieces with extraordinary technique, energy […]

Brief notes on the development of music publishing

September 18, 2013

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Printing music Although printing techniques were used as early as 3000 B.C. in Mesopotamia (using stamps), and later in East Asia in the form of woodblock printing, musical artworks in the Western world were preserved by handwriting until the middle years of the fifteenth century, when Johannes Gutenberg started to use movable types to multiply […]

Luigi Boccherini – creating a lasting impression

September 10, 2013

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Searching for musical notes written down outside Haydn’s, Mozart’s and Beethoven’s study rooms I stumbled into some truly delightful pearls of creation. Prior to this moment in my life, hearing the name of Boccherini would have put a broad smile on my face, reminding me about some of my first contacts with music as a […]